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Volunteers

Reading a Book

About Communities That Care

Communities That Care (CTC) offers school-based mentoring programs that link caring adult volunteers from the community with students in schools. All Reno County students, grades K-12, within participating school districts are eligible to have a CTC mentor. Activities take place on school grounds before, during or after school hours.
CTC volunteer mentors typically visit a school for one hour or less each week to do things like:
  • have lunch with a student
  • help with reading or academic tutoring
  • share an interest or a hobby or simply listen
  • help in a classroom
  • meet one to one with a student who needs a friend
For more information, please contact the CTC office at 615-4018 or email Lisa at orrisonl@usd308.com
 
Regular Volunteer Opportunities in USD 308
 
 
Group
Contact
Phone
Communities That Care
 
 
     
Watch D.O.G.S.
 
620-615-4018
 
 
 
PTO/PTA
 
 
 
Avenue A Elementary
620-615-4950
 
Faris Elementary
620-615-5000
 
Graber Elementary
620-615-5050
 
Hutchinson Magnet School at Allen
620-615-4900
 
Lincoln Elementary
620-615-5100
 
McCandless Elementary
620-615-5150
 
Morgan Elementary School
620-615-5200
 
Wiley Elementary
620-615-5250
 
 
 
Site Councils for all schools
Building Principals
 
 
Hutchinson High School: Ronn Roehm
620-615-4100
 
Hutchinson Middle School - 7: Jeff Shearon
Hutchinson Middle School - 8: Bruce Hurford
620-615-4704
620-615-4804
 
Avenue A Elementary: Beth Redinger
620-615-4955
 
Faris Elementary: Daniel Ackland
620-615-5001
 
Graber Elementary School: Kelley McCall
620-615-5052
 
Hutchinson Magnet School at Allen: Bryan Cunningham
620-615-4905
 
Lincoln Elementary: Darla Fisher
620-615-5102
 
McCandless Elementary: Sheri Hart
620-615-5152
 
Morgan Elementary: Kayla Wiedeman
620-615-5202
 
Wiley Elementary: Alberto Carrillo
620-615-5252
 
 
 
District Budget Committee
Lori Blakesley
620-615-4040
HHS Booster Club
 
620-615-4108
HHS Band Booster Club
 
620-615-4140
 
 

Types of Volunteer

Mentor
Time with a positive adult role model is something kids ask for over and again. Have fun getting to know a student through a variety of activities including sharing a hobby, working on an assignment, playing a game or sport, or just "hanging out." A mentor is a friend and a good listener and helps build the self-confidence students need to succeed in school.
Academic Tutor
Choose your favorite subject: math, reading, writing, science, social studies, computers, music or a foreign language. Work with a student who needs extra attention in that area. Choose to mentor your student before, during or after school to help give him/her advice and direction in tasks such as completing everyday assignments or developing a challenging project.
Breakfast Buddy
Eat breakfast with a student or a small group of students at the school cafeteria (could be a great activity on your way to work). Be a mentor by assisting your student(s) with a class assignment, discussing a book, or just chatting. This is a time to enjoy eating and fun conversation!
Lunch Buddy
Each lunch in the school cafeteria with an individual student or group of students during their lunch period. During your time together, you may also serve as a mentor by playing a board game, reading a story, playing on the playground or working on a special project. This is a time to build self-confidence and let the student know he/she is important.
Read With Me
Working with groups of students by listening to them read or reading to them in order to develop better reading skills.
Reading Buddy
Helping a student one on one develop better reading skills.
Special Projects
We will be glad to design something that suits your desire to be a mentor to a young person. You choose the time and day of the week that fits with your busy schedule and we'll select the student or group of students who can most benefit from your experience.
Career Role Model
Share information about your occupation and discuss your career experience with groups of middle or high school students during a special time. This type of activity may occur during lunchtime or at a scheduled career day, job fair, or classroom presentation